Preventing Hip Flexor Strain

Physical Therapy in Farmingdale, NYPreventing Hip Flexor Strain

In the case of hip flexors, athletes are typically more susceptible to straining this area as opposed to individuals who do not play sports but that doesn’t mean it is impossible. Either way, straining your hip flexor will likely be a painful experience. When undergoing this degree of pain, consider utilizing the benefits of the best physical therapy in Farmingdale, NY over at Farmingdale Physical Therapy East.

Causes:

Similar to most overuse injuries, your hip flexor can become strained when you are using it too much. Not only does this put athletes at risk but individuals who work with their hands and usually execute repetitive movements may also be exposed to experiencing a strain within the hip flexor. Be on the lookout for discomfort in your hip if you fit in the following categories:

  • Step aerobics participants.

  • Soccer players.

  • Kickers on a football team.

  • Dancers.

  • Martial artists.

  • Cyclists.

  • Hockey players.

Also, anyone who executes high knee kicks (i.e. Football Kickers) at the same time as jumping or running increase their risk for hip flexor strain. Improper stretching executions may also develop a strain. In the event of this occurring, use physical therapy in Farmingdale, NY to gather knowledge on how to safely stretch your hip and avoid strains.

If you have developed a hip flexor strain, use the strain scale to better help determine the degree of your injury complication:

  • Grade 1 (Mild) – In this case, you will likely still be able to play sports and continue your ordinary activity. Patients will likely still experience pain, but it may not be quite as severe as higher grades. Taking a few weeks to relax and recuperate is a viable option for accelerating the healing process.

  • Grade 2 (Moderate) – From Grade 2 and above, the pain and potential damage will likely increase in intensity, forcing athletes and workers to sit out for a prolonged period. Your motor functions may also become limited, making regular movements such as walking an arduous task. Healing time may take a couple of weeks to a few months to fully complete.

  • Grade 3 (Severe) – The highest degree of strain, this injury could make walking almost impossible. Some patients may be unable to fully move that leg at all. ┬áInjuries like these are rare but if you do experience this, you will need some months or possibly more to heal properly.

Symptoms:

Hip strain flexors are often accompanied by pain, but other symptoms can be experienced as well. Ignoring the discomfort and other related symptoms of a hip flexor may potentially lead to detrimental complications for your health. If you think you have a hip flexor strain, come to the professionals who study and practice physical therapy in Farmingdale, NY over at Farmingdale PTE. Your physical therapist will conduct an examination for the following symptoms:

  • Pain that spontaneously develops.

  • Bruising.

  • Swelling.

  • Intense pain and cramping.

  • Pain that becomes more intense when you lift your thigh towards your chest.

Treatment/Contact:

There are a few options to help treat hip flexor strains. Surgery could inevitably be an option, but will likely only be considered if the strain has grade 3 potential. Physical therapy in Farmingdale, NY can serve as an outstanding method for treating hip flexor strains. Our physical therapists can execute personalized pain depending on the grade of your strain. These methods can include stretching techniques, recommended periods of rests, and massage related procedures such as soft tissue release. If interested in further detail, contact our offices for an appointment and consultation today!

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